8 thoughts on “Council Calls for Overhaul of City’s Approach to Easing School Crowding

  1. Thank you for addressing the issue of school overcrowding which contributes to excessive class sizes in too many NYC schools. I think you should have made it clear, however, that the vast majority of rigorous studies support the finding that small classes are improve the opportunity to learn and significantly narrow the achievement gap. For these studies, see the bibliography here: https://www.classsizematters.org/research-and-links/ The Institute of Education Sciences identifies class size reduction as one of only four K-12 education reforms proven to increase student achievement through rigorous evidence. See https://www.classsizematters.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/rigorousevidence_guide_IES__3_1.pdf Smaller classes have also been shown to significantly boost the rate of college attendance, with the largest positive impact on black and poor students. Among those students with the lowest predicted probability of attending college, a small class increases the rate of college attendance by 11 percentage points. https://www.classsizematters.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Dynarski_et_al-2013-Journal_of_Policy_Analysis_and_Management-1.pdf

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  6. It’s unfortunate that D24 was not mentioned in this article. Schools in D24 average 1,061 students based on number of schools. District 2, mentioned in the article averages 530 kids/school. Though additions were added at PS. 143 and PS 19 in Queens, SCA is building schools with over 2,100 students in K-5. This is hardly a model for construction and weighs heavily on the principal, staff and students to create a proper learning environment. Then, there is PS 89, whose zone is a space 8 blocks in any direction. Of 28 schools studied in D24, only nine have decreased enrollment over eight years from 2007 to 2015. Increases in enrollment range from 18% to 140% in 10 schools that do not have additions planned. SCA and council must prioritize smaller neighborhood schools in areas such as North Corona and Elmhurst, listed as 4th fastest growing neighborhoods in NYC.

  7. how can you plan when you have all these illegals and their American born US children crowding schools, I know liberalism says we are a sanctuary city but 15% of the kids in NYC public schools are the children of illegals. DOE cant plan for people that don’t answer the census, don’t pay taxes and officially don’t exist except to get hand outs.

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