4 thoughts on “Older Workers are Organizing to Fight Ageism on the Job

  1. I am 72 years old and still work full time as a corporate tax consultant. My company recently came out with a new policy saying that employees over the age of 65 will have their company provided life insurance benefits reduced. In my case my benifits were cut in half. They said this is in line with common practice nationwide and blamed it on Minnesota Life Insurance Company. My company employs 25,000 people. Funny that the company just did a feature article on an engineer employed by us for over 60 years. He’s 78 and still working full time and plans to continue as long as he feels he is making a contribution. We’re still here but feel marginalized and disvalued. Yet the company proclaims to value ALL employees and that’s part of their mission. Another one is “Do the right thing, always.” If they expect their employees to accept their mission it has to start at the top. To me it’s just empty words.

  2. Hi there. I was just today having this conversation on ageism in the workplace with other older women who live globally. A woman who has experience with job recruitment in the UK mentioned in an online group that women should not list their age or their date of college graduation on there CV. As a society of people growing older but remaining relevant and purposeful in the world we need to challenge the old archaic stale work practices of our parents. Accepting that omitting age revealing information on your resume is not the way forward. And even though I believe in volunteerism, I can’t afford to live without getting paid for my talents, skills and abilities. This list has grown throughout the years and has derived not just from my work experiences, but life experiences as well. I have a feeling we will be seeing a lot more written about Ageism in the very near future. Thank you

  3. This is why I loved Maggie Kuhn’s work with the Gray Panthers. It’s horrible how seniors are treated like obsolete products. I’ve worked with people in their 80s and 90s whose experience and knowledge have been invaluable. I think workplaces with a strong intergenerational mix function best. And I may be 50, not 70, but every time I hear a Millennial complain that Boomers aren’t retiring to make space for them, I’m ticked that anyone thinks people should end their careers and upend their lives because of some imaginary “use by” date. And since when does a 22 year old have the experience to take over the job of someone with 40 years of experience anyhow?

    It’s all a bit too Logan’s Run for my taste.

  4. As for my job, I am speaking from hindsight now but it did hit me how ageism was my job’s attitude. I first got a taste of it when I reached the age of 60 ( thankfully I had a plan of action, mentally, to end working at this job because of the physical stress on my body) when I received a letter from the health insurance plan that all medical procedures had to be pre-approved even though I wasn’t changing anything but because I had reached a certain age and once I reached 65, they would no longer cover anything since I would be enrolled on Medicare. The mail n reason behind this was that the cost of an internist ( a doctor you see as an adult) was more expensive than a GP doctor. This resulted in my cutting out annual visits for well care checkups for those 5 years until I got Medicare benefits because the costs of those visits were not covered (in other words I had health insurance but couldn’t use it until I paid $10,000 out of pocket costs). If that wasn’t insulting enough, when the company decided to belly up and close down entirely by declaring bankruptcy, I was told flat out by the union who was re-settling workers, that they assumed I was retiring (at age 64, even though I wanted to reach full retirement age of 66, eighteen months later). When I asked about possible job opportunities, they would only offer me an extremely part time position at minimum wage (which was less than half my wage) rather than my wage working as a part timer. So instead of utilizing my skills ( I was a department manager) , they were encouraging me to retire, which I did at a cost to my Social Security benefits.
    They want to push Us out of the workforce plus they want to eliminate us getting our Social Security benefits so the younger able bodied can get free government benefits. I for one will not stop and roll over. Good thing I have planned ahead to cut my bills to what I expected to have in retirement (necessities). I wouldn’t be so mad about this if the younger generation working actually put in the same effort as we did but too many of them think blue collar jobs get done by magic.

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