The Yankees Unobstructed — July 12

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It's All-Star week, which can only mean two things — 1. A hefty chunk of Yankees are playing for a national audience, and 2. It's time for the BxNN Mid-Summer Yankee awards!

Let's start with the good stuff….
MVP: Robinson Cano may very well be the American League's MVP, and he's certainly the best player on the Yankees. He's at or near the top of several statistical indicators of greatness, including (but not limited to) Gracefulness (11.83 GPS), the Nice Hair Index (98th percentile) and Brightest Smile.
Best Run Campaign: When the race for the final American League All-Star spot came down to Yankee outfielder Nick Swisher and Red Sox first baseman Kevin Youkilis, you knew things would get dirty. Swisher took the lead after he released a campaign video (if anyone can find a link to this, please let me know), but you knew Swisher was a lock when Kevin Youkilis got an unexpected campaign plea from John Kerry.
Most Exciting Contributor: Out of nowhere, Francisco Cervelli has become everyone's favorite sparkplug. Thrust into the spotlight when Jorge Posada was injured early on, Cervelli has become one of the most reliable hitters in the lineup.
Ageless Glory: Nothing feels more like 1998 than watching Andy Pettitte start a game and Mariano Rivera close it out. And that's been happening a lot this year. Sure, they're balding and they need to walk around almost all day long with ice on their arms, but those guys are holding this team together.
Now it's time for the not so good stuff….
Biggest Disappointment: Seriously, Joba Chamberlain has sucked. The setup man leads the team in several statistical indicators of terribleness, including Cowardliness and Awkward Smiles. Oh, and he's also given up two or more runs in a single inning six times this season.
LVP: When Chan Ho Park is summoned from the bullpen, you can hear the entire stadium groan. At one point this season, the $1.2 million reliever surrendered runs in five straight outings. In fact, he's had fewer scoreless appearances (10) than ones in which he's given up runs (11).
The Apology: Once again, I'm sorry David Robertson. I really am. After I told everyone I know that Robertson was the second coming of Mariano, he proceeded to blow every single close game he could get his hands on.
NOTE: Make sure to check back every week for The Yankees, Unobstructed, BNN's Yankees opinion column.