9 thoughts on “13 Years After Blocking New Development, Staten Island Hopes to Welcome Just Enough of it

  1. Interesting synopsis of development and how it is regulated on Staten Island, though I question the use of the word “welcome” in your headline. Maybe Staten Islanders are willing to tolerate just enough development.

    • S.I. current population is 474,558. There really is no practical way to accommodate large increases in population for the reasons stated in my post of 3/14/17. Why does every part of the city have to be a crowded mess? S.I. and eastern Queens are among the few areas where a middle-class New Yorker can buy a 1 or 2 family home. Approx 67% of Staten Islanders are homeowners. In the others 4 boroughs an average of 72% are renters. NYC renters put up with a lot of abuse but homeowners care more about their home community because they have the significant financial investment of their home.

  2. The downzonings had been desired by east shore and south shore SI residents for years. Staten Island as a limited road infrastructure with no true street grids as in the other boroughs. Our arterial road network is still pretty much what the Dutch and British left us. That’s one of the reasons our local bus network is so difficult to change.

    We of course don’t have a subway connection and never will. So it’s either the ferry or the express bus to Manhattan. And we can’t get the MTA to increase express bus service or add new express routes. The S.I. Expressway and the Verrazano Narrows Bridge are at or near capacity. So that express bus ride eats up more time every year.

    S.I. is served by two 60 year old water/sewer treatment plants. The related water/sewer mains were installed over the last 75 years for a much smaller S.I. Even a few new high rises on the north shore will dangerously stress that system.

    Staten Islander don’t want to hear about this ‘Fair Share’ nonsense. For 54 years we shouldered the Fresh Kills garbage dump. Today even simple things like getting a new traffic signal are blocked by the city.

    I live in one of the downzoned areas of the east shore. I don’t see that it impacted property values either way. Homes sell quickly in my area because it’s an established desirable area of mostly 1-family homes and is near the Hylan Blvd express buses and shopping centers.

  3. Go back and look at the plans Robert Moses had for Staten Island. Never came to fruition though. Those parkways would have taken traffic off the inadequate local roads.

    • True about the Richmond Parkway and Shore Front Parkway. Will never happen but the state should complete the Richmond Parkway all the way to the Staten Island Expressway. Forget about the Shore Front Parkway. Moses acquired the land for it but it never got off the drawing board.

  4. So on the one hand people want downzoning because it increases property values, yet on the other hand upzoning is bad because it increases property values. Huh?

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