6 thoughts on “Building Justice: Racial Stereotypes Shape Perceptions of New York’s Public Housing

  1. There was no white flight in schools, parents saw the next generation of kids on a jail track and not a college one, so they moved and guess what? so did blacks.

    • The statement must be considered in the context of the dates/ era/ time period of roughly 1950 to 1965 that the author is referencing. A period in which there was indeed increase migration of Whites to the suburbs partly due to the perception of upward mobility in moving to suburbs and largely due to an inherent outcome of robust economy and growth in civil service and non-profit jobs that Whites enjoyed under affirmative action practices ( aka, racial discrimination against others ) in the traditional employment opportunities, like Construction, Policing, Fire-fighting and FIRE! The article’s author very timidly points out, and understates, the level of racial discrimination against Blacks and Hispanics participation in most areas New York and Cities, in general. I suppose there was just so much time, or space, within the paper to make his point! It might helpful for many to really study and think more critically, rather than simply spouting out insults!

  2. Pingback: Community Developments: Affordable Housing Crisis, Fair Housing Ruling – Right Now Help Services

  3. I disagree with privatizing NYCHA. NYCHA is working under the duress of huge Federal cutbacks, which the State and City have not been able to totally make up. Many developments are well run despite the budget shortfalls. Curtailing crime is a function of good policing, not private management. NYCHA managers do send tenants in violation of their lease agreements to housing court for eviction. Rather than subsidize private landlords for affordable housing, I think that expanding public housing, and Mitchell Llama housing would create more permanent affordable housing for the money spent.

    • Excellent point. NYCHA’s management of its housing portfolio has improved somewhat under the current Mayor DeBlasio and Commissioner, but NYCHA needs massive cash infusion to provide building upgrades for long term sustainability and to meet its operating costs. The lack of funding to Public Housing is due to years of no growth in the funding allocation to Public Housing because of Congressional Budget austerity measures. This is another issue alluded to in the article but fully developed. However, should the funding come largely from the Private sector financing? …Well, it depends on the terms of agreement. These agreements should be monitored very closely to avoid what I can best describe as the Charterization of Public Housing–Lacking in Public accountability and where shareholders and chief executives profit immensely! And we certainly don’t need another leaky boat program, like Mitchell Lama, where buildings at the end of the agreement are subject rapacious Private sector Landlords who raise rents as high as market can yield. The RAD Program is an attempt to explore alternative funding and management solutions. Stay tune to see how and if it serves the real mission, Affordable Public Housing so far! Can the City, State, and Congress in particular do more? Yes, they can …and should!

    • Yes, excellent point about real concerns! NYCHA’s management of its housing portfolio has improved somewhat under the current Mayor DeBlasio and Commissioner, but NYCHA needs massive cash infusion to provide building upgrades for long term sustainability and to meet its operating costs. The lack of funding to Public Housing is due to years of no growth in the funding allocation to Public Housing, because of Congressional Budget austerity measures. This is another issue alluded to in the article but not fully developed. However, should the funding come largely from the Private sector financing? …Well, it depends on the terms of agreement. These agreements should be monitored very closely to avoid what I can best describe as the Charterization of Public Housing–Lacking in Public accountability and where shareholders and chief executives profit immensely! And we certainly don’t need another leaky boat program, like Mitchell Lama, where buildings at the end of the agreement are subject rapacious Private sector Landlords who raise rents as high as market can yield. The RAD Program is an attempt to explore alternative funding and management solutions. Stay tune to see how and if it serves the real mission, Affordable Public Housing! Can the City, State, and Congress in particular do more? Yes, they can …and should!

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