Governor’s Race Is No Party for Working Families

While some of the city’s major unions already supporting Governor Pataki for re-election, other leading members of the Working Families Party are split between the two Democratic hopefuls for the state’s top seat, leaving the labor-based political party with what could be the toughest endorsement decision of its young career.

HIDDEN TRANSLATIONS

Immigrants in need of unemployment benefits better brush up on their English or Spanish. While the state launched new translation services for applicants a couple of weeks ago, more often than not they need translators just to access the program.

TAXING FOR TENANTS

Barely six years after the city forcibly evicted squatters from five city-owned tenements on the Lower East Side and handed then over to an affordable housing developer, the buildings are right back where they started: on the city’s list of tax-delinquent properties.

WAGING FOR A LIVABLE SALARY

After years of delays, a bill requiring that companies that do business with the city pay their employees a living wage may finally be introduced in the City Council this week, but its supporters are wondering if this is the best or worst time to raise the issue.

RACE FOR THE NEXT GOODMAN, OR WOMAN

The city’s teachers union overlooked some differences of opinion on education policy last week to endorse Republican John Ravitz in his race for Roy Goodman’s state senate seat, leaving some labor leaders wondering if the United Federation of Teachers and other major municipal employee unions are bending under pressure from Senate Majority Leader Joseph Bruno.

THIS WEEK'S GLOBAL POLITICS

With the city’s attention focused on the terrorist attacks, and with some South Asian and Arab immigrants still reeling from bias attacks waged against them over the last two weeks, City Council candidates fear their hopes of becoming the first person from their countries to be elected to public office in the United States will be dashed tomorrow, primary day.

DRIVEN TO DESPAIR

While financial aid pours in to help workers whose jobs were based inside the Twin Towers, businesses one degree removed from the Trade Center are suffering alone: Last week, the limo business took a nose dive, and the drivers wonder how they will survive.