Growing Fish and Food Together and Attacking Racial Disparities in Bushwick

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Aquaponics relies on the relationship between fish, whose waste feeds the plants, and plants, whose digestive process purifies the water.

Kizzy Cox

Aquaponics relies on the relationship between fish, whose waste feeds the plants, and plants, whose digestive process purifies the water.

When Yemi Amu and Jonathan Boe created Oko Farms in Bushwick Brooklyn, their goal was simple: make healthy food accessible to everyone. Three years later that goal is becoming a reality, but transforming a grungy, garbage-strewn lot into a successful aquaponics farm wasn’t easy.

For one thing, few people even know what aquaponics is.

Yet Amu is determined to not only educate people about aquaponics and sustainable food, she hopes to inspire other young people of color to flex their green thumbs as well. Check out the video to learn more about aquaponics, what they’ve learned from growing food in the heart of Brooklyn and the important piece of advice they have for prospective urban farmers.

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City Limits’ coverage of food policy is supported by the Laurie M. Tisch Illumination Fund. Read the other stories in our CityPlate series.

One thought on “Growing Fish and Food Together and Attacking Racial Disparities in Bushwick

  1. I’m happy when I read of how good things and especially things related to “Growing and Raising” . I grew up in Bushwick and am joyful with the creativity Nice going ! I’m sventy one years old and left back in 1967 or so and would like to visit.What is the parking situation? Thank you

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