Guidance for Election 2011's Few Choices

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Robert T. Johnson, district attorney of the Bronx (above) and Richard A. Brown, his counterpart in Queens, are nominated on several ballot lines and face no opposition Tuesday.

Photo by: Bronx DA/Queens DA/ Jarrett Murphy

Robert T. Johnson, district attorney of the Bronx (above) and Richard A. Brown, his counterpart in Queens, are nominated on several ballot lines and face no opposition Tuesday.

For the third election in a row, Bronx District Attorney Robert T. Johnson and Queens District Attorney Richard A. Brown will have no one but themselves to beat on Tuesday.

As was the case in 2003 and 2007, both Johnson (Democrat-Republican-Conservative) and Brown (Democrat-Republican-Conservative) face no opponent, so voters’ only choice is which party lever to pull for each man. Neither has faced opposition since 1999, when Johnson—who has held his post since 1989—faced a Republican, and Brown (a DA since 1991) fought off a Green party candidate.

Staten Island’s district attorney race is also a repeat, but a slightly more interesting one, as incumbent Daniel Donovan (Republican- Independent) faces Democrat- Conservative Michael Ryan, whom he bested in 2007.

New Yorkers who fulfill their civic duty by going to the polls in spite of the uninspiring menu of races will face once again the puzzling prospect of having to vote on judicial candidates that they know nothing about.

Those looking for a little guidance can find it in an online Voters Guide offered by the New York State court system.

Not every candidate has provided information for the guide, but those who have reveal their educational background and work history, as well as the ratings they’ve received from the Bar Association.

There are no judicial races in the Bronx this year, but there are voter guides for:

  • Brooklyn
  • Manhattan
  • Queens
  • Staten Island.