Aftershock: Manhattan Hospitals Strained By Closure Of St. Vincent's

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The ambulance bay at Bellevue Hospital. Since St. Vincent's closed, the hospital has seen ER visits rise by 25 percent and ambulance runs increase by about a third.

Photo by: Marc Fader

The ambulance bay at Bellevue Hospital. Since St. Vincent's closed, the hospital has seen ER visits rise by 25 percent and ambulance runs increase by about a third.

When Stacey Miller collapsed in a Beth Israel Medical Center bathroom on April 30th, her life was literally running out of her body.

A pounding headache had propelled her to call her best friend twice to take her to the hospital. Unable to wait, she finally took a cab across town, arriving at Beth Israel's emergency room at 16th Street and First Avenue a little after 11 p.m.

On an earlier occasion, when she had a broken ankle, Miller had gone to St. Vincent's Medical Center on 12th Street. But that option wasn't open this time. St. Vincent's, one subway stop south from Miller's apartment on 23rd Street and 7th avenue, had closed its emergency room on April 9, and had full shut down all other in patient functions by April 30—the same day Miller's headache sent her to the ER across town.